Sushrut Institute of Pharmacy

INDIAN PATENT AND INDIAN PATIENT, FRIEND OR RIVAL: A COMMUNICATION

ABOUT AUTHORS:
Prathima Patil*1, Tahseen Sameena1, S.P.Sethy, K.Shailaja1, P.Mishra2
1Department Of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Sushrut Institute of Pharmacy
Taddanpally (V), Pulkal (M), Medak-502293.
2Department Of Pharmacology, Malla Reddy College Of Pharmacy
Maisimaguda, Dhulapalli, Secundrabad-14
pratima.patil0@gmail.com

ABSTRACT:
Though patents are effective tools for promoting innovation and protecting intellectual property in the pharmaceutical sciences, there has been a growing concern that the current scenario of patient and patent is not vivid in developing countries like India. A lot of complications arise when a pharmaceutical firm applies for patent for their product in developing countries. Innovation in global health care needs patent protection as a safeguard, so patent is a must requires item for health care industries. We can say Patent as a fuel for innovation simultaneously it can burn the pocket of economically backward patients in developing countries. But this thing should not happen as both patent and patient needs each other. A friendly relationship should exist between them. In this context we have discussed about various aspect of patent and patient related issue and also about sensible solution for the issue.

PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT IN PHARMACEUTICALS: A REVIEW

ABOUT AUTHORS:
S.P.Sethy*, Tahseen Sameena, Prathima Patil, K.Shailaja
Department Of Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
Sushrut Institute of Pharmacy
Taddanpally (V), Pulkal (M), Medak-502293
sarada9439504350@gmail.com

ABSTRACT:
The complexity of today’s pharmaceutical market requires more efficient drug development and production. Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) has the opportunity to make pharmaceutical production more effective and with lower risk – even in this vastly complex environment. The product lifecycle management creates and manages a company's product-related intellectual capital starting from an idea to its final retreat. In pharmaceutical industry, it benefits through enhancing the lifespan of patent and pricing strategies. Improved patient compliance, revenue growth, expanded clinical benefits; cost advantages life extension exclusivity and quicker market launch are amongst the main applications of product lifecycle management. Leaders are actively implementing PLM and are reaping the benefits of fewer problems, lower costs, higher yields, employees armed to make good decisions, and audits that make everyone more confident as they access the information they need. The present manuscript focuses on product lifecycle management, problems and the key solutions for a successful product lifecycle management in pharmaceuticals.

BE AWARE OF ROHYPNOL: A SHORT COMMUNICATION

ABOUT AUTHORS:
Tahseen Sameena*1, S.P.Sethy, Prathima Patil, G.Naresh, Md.Owais Ashraf, Radhika
Department Of Pharmaceutics.
Sushrut Institute of Pharmacy
Taddanpally (V), Pulkal (M), Medak-502293
tahseensameena1992@gmail.com

ABSTRACT:
Scientific research on drug abuse indicates this as being a rising trend among the youth around the globe. An investigation into the experimentation with drugs among the youth showed a rate of increase of 8%. The study also revealed an 85.9% increase in alcohol use and 35.2% increase in tobacco use.  Furthermore, the study also suggests an increase in the rate of ecstasy and alcohol usage coupled with drugs and opiates such as heroin.  This article will thus endeavour to form a network of Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) whose purpose will be the development and implementation of a joint action plan to prevent substance abuse in around the world, in order to promote active engagement of civil society in this field.

CARBON NANO TUBE: A REVIEW

ABOUT AUTHOR:
K.Shailaja, Tahseen Sameena, S.P.Sethy, Prathima Patil, Md. Owais Ashraf,
Department Of Pharmaceutics.
Sushrut Institute of Pharmacy
Taddanpally (V), Pulkal (M), Medak-502293
shilu.kolmani@gmail.com

ABSTRACT:-
Carbon nanotubes have unique physical and chemical properties that chemists are trying to better understand through laboratory research. One of the physical properties of carbon nanotubes is that it’s possible to make them only a single atomic layer thick. This means that they can be about 1/50,000th the thickness of a human hair. Because of the bonding characteristics of carbon atoms, the physical appearance of carbon nanotubes can often resemble rolled up chicken wire. One of the interesting physical properties about carbon nanotubes is that when you have two of them which have slightly different physical structures and they are joined together, the junction (gap or small space) between them can function as an electronic device. This electronic behavior depends upon the structure of the two tubes. Currently scientists are trying to make carbon nanotubes in large amounts (high yield) with a high degree of purity (little or no material defects)so that the physical structures are all the same. If they have similar physical and chemical properties then it becomes easier to predict their behavior which would ultimately make them more useful for possible nano sensors. These nano sensors could behave like semiconducting materials in microelectronic circuits, or detect small changes in electric current, or register chemical reactivity, or changes in air pressure or temperature For a more detailed outline of the possible applications of carbon nanotubes see the further sections of this document. Since carbon nanotube science is relatively new, scientists from the fields of chemistry, physics and the material sciences are just beginning to unlock its mysteries and hypothesize about its potential applications.

“PROSTAGLANDIN” A USEFUL STRATEGY FOR NEW DRUG DEVELOPMENT: A REVIEW

ABOUT AUTHORS:
S.P.Sethy*1, P.Mishra2, T.Sameena1, P.Patil1, K.Shailaja1
*1Department Of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Sushrut Institute of pharmacy
Taddanpally (V), Pulkal (M), Medak Dist-502273
2Department Of Pharmacology.
Malla Reddy College Of Pharmacy, Maisamaguga,
Dhulapalli, Secunderabad-14
sarada9439504350@gmail.com

ABSTRACT:
The prostaglandins are a family of lipids, originally discovered over 30 years ago in human seminal fluid, which have since been found not only to have a wide variety of striking pharmacological actions, but also to be present in many if not all mammalian tissues. They have an unusual chemical structure, being 20-carbon fatty acids derived enzymically from the essential fatty acids by cyclization and oxidation. Converting enzymes have been demonstrated in many tissues; they are especially active in the vesicular glands of the sheep, which are used for a practical method of biosynthesis. Physiological roles for these recently rediscovered compounds are yet to be established, but whenever substances are found in tissues which in very small doses can affect the function of these tissues, there is the possibility that they are regulators of physiological activity. Each effect of one or another prostaglandin suggests a corresponding physiological role, whether stimulatory or inhibitory, on such systems as smooth muscle, nerves, the circulation, and the reproductive organs. In the last named, roles in relation to fertility and coitus and later possible action in relation to labor and postpartum uterine contraction have been proposed. Prostaglandins liberated by nerve stimulation, which then have actions opposite to that of the nerve stimulation, suggests a role as feed-back inhibitors. Thus, sympathetic nerve stimulation to adipose tissue induces both lipolysis and the release of antilipolytic prostaglandins, and vagal stimulation to the stomach, both secretion and the release of prostaglandins with powerful antisecretory actions. On the other hand, the ability of minute amounts of certain prostaglandins, inactive in their own right, to potentiate other agonists, suggests a more general role on ion transport or membrane function. Now days, many prostaglandin analogues are in market, while several hundred are in clinical trials.