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LIPOSOMES: NOVEL DRUG DELIVERY CARRIER


APPLICATIONS2, 5, 13, 14
1.      Liposome as drug/protein delivery vehicles

a.       Controlled and sustained drug release

b.      Altered pharmacokinetics and biodistribution

c.       Enhanced drug solubilization

d.      Enzyme replacement therapy and biodistribution

e.       Altered pharmacokinetics and biodistribution

2.      Liposome in antimicrobial, antifungal and antiviral therapy

a.       Liposomal drugs

b.      Liposomal biological response modifiers

3.      Liposome in tumour therapy

a.       Carrier of small cytotoxic molecules

b.      Vehicle for macromolecules as cytokines or genes

4.      Liposome in gene delivery

a.       Gene and antisense therapy

b.      Genetic (DNA) vaccination

5.      Liposome in immunology

a.       Immunoadjuvant

b.      Immunodiagnosis

c.       Immunomodulator

6.      Liposome as artificial blood surrogates
7.      Liposome in enzyme immobilization and bioreactor technology
8.      Liposome in cosmetics and dermatology
9.      Liposome as radiopharmaceutical and radio diagnostic carriers

REFERENCES:
1.Kamble R., Pokharkar V. B. and Badde S. and Kumar A., “Development and characterization of liposomaldrug delivery system for nimesulide”, Int. J. Pharm. Pharm. Sci., 2010; Vol. 2(4): 87-89.
2.Jain N. K., “Controlled and novel drug delivery”, CBS publishers and distributors, 2007: 304.
3.Allen T.M., “Liposomes: Opportunities in drug delivery”, Drugs, 1997; Vol. 54: 8-14.
4.Allen T.M. and Moase E.H., “Therapeutic opportunities for targeted liposomal drug delivery”, Adv Drug Deliv Rev, 1996; Vol. 21: 117-133.
5.Vyas S.P. and Khar R.K. 2006. “Targeted And Controlled Drug Delivery: Novel Carrier Systems”, CBS Publishers & Distributor, 1st Edition, 2006: 421-427.
6.Patel S.S., “Liposome: A versatile platform for targeted delivery of drugs”, Pharmainfo.net, 2006; Vol. 4(5): 1-5.
7.Mayer L.D., Hope M.J., Cullis P.R. and Janoff A.S., “Solute distributions and trapping efficiencies observed in freeze-thawed multilmellar vesicles”, Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 1985; Vol. 817: 193-196.
8.Bally M., Nayar R., Masin D., Hope M.J., Cullis P.R. and Mayer L.D., “Liposomes with entrapped doxorubicin exhibit extended blood residence times”, Biochim Biophys Acta, 1990; Vol. 1023: 133-139.
9.Woodle M.C. and Papahadjopoulos D., “Liposome preparation and size characterization”, Methods Enzymol., 1989; Vol. 171: 193-217.
10.Sharma A. and Sharma U.S., “Liposomes in drug delivery: Progress and limitations”, Int. J. Pharm., 1997; Vol. 154: 123-140.
11.Sharma V.K., Mishra D.N., Sharma A.K. and Srivastava B., “Liposomes: Present Prospective and Future Challenges”, IJCPR, 2010; Vol. 1(2): 7-16.
12.Hope M.J. and Kitson C.N., “Liposomes: A perspective for dermatologists”, Dermatol. Clin., 1993; Vol. 11: 143-154.
13.Chrai S.S., Murari R. and Ahmad I., “Liposomes (a review) part one: manufacturing issues”, Bio. Pharm., 2001; Vol. 11: 10-14.
14.Szoke F.J. and Papahadjopoulos D., “Comparative properties and methods of preparation of lipid vesicles (liposomes)”, Ann. Rev. Biophys. Bioeng., 1980; Vol. 9: 467-508.

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