Brain as a Sancturian Site in Drug Delivery Approaches to Improve Bioavailability in Brain

  • Posted on: 1 July 2014
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PharmaTutor (July- 2014)
ISSN: 2347 - 7881

 

Received On: 05/05/2014; Accepted On: 11/05/2014; Published On: 01/07/2014

 

AUTHORS: Sagar Vishwanath Sonawane*
Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology,
Institute of Chemical Technology,
Matunga, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.
*sssagarvs@gmail.com

 

ABSTRACT:
Brain is the highly protected organ of the body by the sanctuary known as blood brain barrier (BBB). BBB comprises of tight junctions formed by the closed fenestration network of astrocytes, pericytes microglial cells and endothelial cells. Thus it is very difficult for drug molecules to cross BBB. Thus various approaches are discussed to overcome this barrier. Disruption of BBB was conventional invasive approach. The permeability of BBB increases in various diseases. This increased permeability of BBB is made use for drug trafficking. With advances in nanotechnology, various nanocarrier systems including Polymeric nanoparticles, Micelle, Dendrimer, Liposomes, Solid lipid nanoparticles, Nanostuctured lipid carriers, nanogels, etc. emerged as potential delivery systems.
Administration of inhibitors of p-glycoprotein with drug is another approach. Making lipophilic prodrugs of active drug substances can also be done.
Recently PEGylation of nanoparticles can be done to improve its half life in the body, known as the stealth technology. Further various receptor mediated processes are made use of for transport of nanocarrier across BBB. In this method the nanocarrier is attached to the targeting ligand thus making it receptor specific. The newer concept of molecular Trojan horses is also discussed. Finally the advantages of intranasal drug delivery are emphasized.

 

How to cite this article: SV Sonawane; Brain as a Sancturian Site in Drug Delivery Approaches to Improve Bioavailability in Brain; PharmaTutor; 2014; 2(7); 63-82

 

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