INVITRO STUDIES ON THE EFFECT OF TERMINALIA ARJUNA IN ADIPOCYTE 3T3 - L1 CELL LINES

 

Figure – 3: HPLC analysis of Quercetin content in Terminalia arjuna

Quercetin content in plant extract

Sl.no

Sample name

Area

Quercetin

(Microgram/gram)

Quercetin

(Milligram/gram)

1

Quercetin

1296.19

 

 

2

T. arjuna

138.80

1070.85

1.07

Table – 5: HPLC analysis of Quercetin

Cell line: 3T3L1

Conc. µg/ml

O.D at

590 nm

% Viability

 

Control

0.5911

100.00

Terminalia arjuna

10

0.5825

98.55

20

0.5752

97.31

40

0.5798

98.09

80

0.5661

95.77

160

0.5651

95.60

320

0.5372

90.88

Table – 6: Cytotoxic study of Terminalia arjuna

Figure – 4: Cytotoxic study of Terminalia arjuna

DISCUSSION:
From Table – 1, phytochemical compounds which includes alkaloids, terpenoids, steroids, reducing sugars, sponins, flavonoids, proteins and steroids. Phenol and Tannin are absent.

From Table – 2 and Figure – 1, studies on Hydroxyl radical scavenging assay using Quercetin as standard and compared the results with IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) values the Terminalia arjuna root extract IC50 value were found less in Terminalia arjuna root extract than Quercetin. Hence it is understood that the Terminalia arjuna (IC50:28.01µg/ml) had less inhibitory concentration when compare to Quercetin (IC50: 30.35ug/ml). It has radical scavenging property but not to the extent of standard Quercetin.

From Table – 3, 4 and Figure – 3, 4, the flavonoids were quantified at 254nm using peak area by comparison with a calibration curve derived from the quercetin. The HPLC chromatograms from root of Terminalia arjuna the main difference was in peak eluted at 3.4min. External flavonoids were already analyzed using HPLC method in various plant extracts. The peaks in this study shown marked increased in peak area in case of Terminalia arjuna when compared with standard quercetin.

From Table – 5, the calibration curve results, the amount of Quercetin, in the sample injected was calculated. Terminalia arjuna contain 1.07 mg/g of quercetin. Other peaks (#1) in both the HPLC chromatogram Terminalia arjuna extracts indicated the presence of other chemical constituents The present method was applicable for determining quercetin in any aerial part of plant material using HPLC technique.

From Table – 5 and Figure – 4, the studies on 3T3L1adipocyte cell line using MTT assay after completing sub cell culture collected the cells when they reach about 70-80% confluency, showed significant proliferation of 3T3L1 cells growth. These results suggest that these plants have more proliferative capability on 3T3L1 cells compared to control and shown significant dose-dependent inhibition of growth of 3T3L1cells. Hence the Terminalia arjuna extract was found to be a powerful anti diabetic component that can inhibit the growth of 3T3L1cell lines.

CONCLUSION:
Our results are in accordance with the above findings, and showed that Terminalia arjuna possess maximum phytochemicals. The above literatures lend credibility to the observation that Terminalia Arjuna is good in radical scavengers. The maximum hydroxyl scavenging IC50 valve of standard Quercetin and Terminalia Arjuna was found to be 30.35 and 28.01 respectively. The MTT assay states that it was found that there were cytotoxic effects with increasing concentration on3T3-L1 cell line from 10µg to 320µg concentration when compared to the untreated 3T3-L1 cell line.

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