Research News

Stem Cells that Regenerate Bones and Cartilage Identified

  • Posted on: 17 February 2015
  • By: PharmaTutor News

Researchers, including one of Indian-origin, have identified stem cells capable of regenerating both bone and cartilage in mice. Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) discovered the cells, called osteochondroreticular (OCR) stem cells, in bone marrow of mice by tracking a protein expressed by the cells.

Cone Snail Venom may Hold Cure for Cancer, Addiction

  • Posted on: 17 February 2015
  • By: PharmaTutor News

Cone snail venom may lead to medical treatments for some cancers and nicotine addiction, a new study has found. Cone snails are marine mollusks, just as conch, octopi and squid, but they capture their prey using venom. The venom of these marine critters provides leads for detection and possible treatment of some cancers and addictions, researchers said.

3-D Facial imaging may help detect autism early

  • Posted on: 14 February 2015
  • By: PharmaTutor News

Advanced 3-D facial imaging may aid in early detection of autism in kids, say scientists. Researchers at the University of Missouri used advanced three-dimensional imaging and statistical analysis techniques to identify facial measurements in children with autism that may lead to a screening tool for young children and provide clues to its genetic causes.

DNA 'Smart Glue' may help build Tissues, Organs

  • Posted on: 13 February 2015
  • By: admin

DNA strands can act as a glue to hold together 3-D-printed materials that could someday be used to grow tissues and organs in the lab, a new study has found. Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin said that although scientists have used nucleic acids such as DNA to assemble objects, most of these are nanosized - so tiny that humans can’t see them with the naked eye.

First Contracting Human Muscle Grown in Lab

  • Posted on: 11 February 2015
  • By: admin

Researchers have for the first time grown human skeletal muscle in the lab which contracts and responds just like native tissue to external stimuli such as electrical pulses, biochemical signals and pharmaceuticals. The lab-grown tissue will allow researchers to test new drugs and study diseases in functioning human muscle outside of the human body to provide personalised medicine to patients.

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