Research News

Smoking may cause Loss of Y Chromosome

  • Posted on: 7 March 2015
  • By: admin

Smoking can cause loss of the Y chromosome in blood cells, which may put male smokers at a greater risk of cancer, a new study has found. Researchers at Uppsala University in Sweden found an association between smoking and loss of the Y chromosome in blood cells. Loss of the Y chromosome was more common in heavy smokers compared to moderate smokers, the study found. Since only men have the Y chromosome, these results might explain why smoking is a greater risk factor for cancer among men and, in the broader perspective, also why men in general have a shorter life expectancy, researchers said.

Targeting 'Hot Zones' may stop spread of HIV in Africa

  • Posted on: 7 March 2015
  • By: PharmaTutor News

A new strategy that focuses on targeting "hot zones" - areas where the risk of HIV infection is much higher than the national average - can help stop the spread of the virus in Africa, scientists say. Globally, more than 34 million people are infected with HIV; in sub-Saharan Africa alone, 3 million new infections occur annually. In an attempt to stop the spread of HIV, governments in the region are considering providing antiretroviral drugs to people who do not have the virus but are at risk for becoming infected, researchers said. Such drugs are known as pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP.

Vitamin D Reduces Lung Disease Flare-UPS

  • Posted on: 2 March 2015
  • By: PharmaTutor News

Vitamin D supplements can reduce chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) flare-ups by over 40 per cent in patients with a vitamin D deficiency, according to a new research. Researchers from Queen Mary University of London conducted a randomised trial on 240 patients with COPD in and around London. Half of the patients (122) received vitamin D supplements and the other half (118) received an equivalent placebo.

Ability of HIV to cause AIDS is Slowing: Study

  • Posted on: 2 March 2015
  • By: PharmaTutor News

The rapid evolution of HIV, which has allowed the virus to develop resistance to patients' immunity, is at the same time slowing the virus's ability to cause AIDS, according to a new research. The study also suggested that people infected by HIV are likely to progress to AIDS more slowly because of widespread access to antiretroviral therapy (ART).

Gut Microbes may Trigger Autoimmune Disease Later in Life

  • Posted on: 2 March 2015
  • By: PharmaTutor News

Researchers have found that the colonisation of the gut by certain types of bacteria may lead to immune responses later in life that are linked to autoimmune disease. Researchers in mice studies found that increases in the levels of segmented filamentous bacteria can trigger changes in the lymphoid tissue of the mouse gut that result in the production of antibodies that attack components of the cell nucleus.

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