GLOBAL SCENARIO OF HERBAL DRUG TODAY AND TOMORROW

 

Table 2: List of medicinal plants whose market potential is very high31

Name of the plant

Common name

Medicinal uses

Aconitum ferox

(Ranunculaceae)

Vatsnabh

Cardiac stimulant

Anti-rheumatic

Anti-inflammatory

Allium sativum

(Liliaceae)

Garlic

Anti-hypertensive

Anti-hyperlipidemic

Platelet aggregation suppressant

Azadirachata indica

(Meliaceae)

Neem

Anti-septic

Anthelmintic

febrifuge


Asparagus recemosus

(Liliaceae)

Satavari

Galactogogue

Diuretic

Nervine disorder

Andographis paniculata

(Acanthaceae)

Kalmegh

Hepatoprotective

Bitter tonic

Stomachache

febrifuge

Commiphora weightii

(Buseraceae)

Guggul

Hypocholesteremic

Hypolipidemic

Anti-inflammatory

Anti-rheumatic

Crocus sativus

(Iridaceae)

Saffron

Colouring agent

Flavouring agent

stimulant

Nardostachys jatamansi

(valerianaceae)

Jatamansi

Sedative

Diuretic

In stress

Emblica officinalis

(Euphorbiaceae)

Amla

Anti-oxidnat

Hepatoprotective

Diuretic

Laxative

Anti-inflammatory

Gymnema sylvestre

(Asclepiadaceae)

Gudmar

Anti-diabetic

Cardiac stimulant

Holarrhena antidysenterica

(Apocynaceae)

Kurchi

Amoebicidal

Anti-protozoal

Ocimum sanctum

(Labiatae)

Tulsi

Aromatic

Stimulant

Anti-diabetic

Anti-inflammatory

tonic

Picrorhiza kurroa

(scrophulariaceae)

Kutki

Hepatoprotective

Jaundice

Fever

Immunomodulatory

Plantago ovata

(Plantaginaceae)

Isabgol

Aphrodiasic

Laxative

Emollient

Demulcent

Anti-inflammatory

Saraca indica

(Leguminoseae)

Ashoka

Gynecologic disorders

Uterine tonic

sedative

Tinosopora cordifolia

(Menispermaceae)

Guduchi

Anti-cancer

Anti-malarial

Anti-allergic

Anti-spasmodic

Anti-leprotic

Anti-oxidant

Anti-inflammatory

Withania somnifera

(Solanaceae)

Ashwgandha

Sedative

Anti-rheumatic

Diuretic

Anti-inflammatory

Anti-stress

Anti-tumor

Immunomodulator

Hypotensive

References:
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6. Chopra, R.N., Nayar, S.L. and Chopra, 1.c. (1956): In Glossary of Indian medicinal plants, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi.1;197.
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19.Safety monitoring of medicinal products: guidelines for setting up and running a pharmacovigilance centre. Uppsala, Uppsala Monitoring Centre, 2000 (reproduced in Part II of this publication).
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21. Three out of four Germans have used complementary or natural remedies. Br Med J 2002;325:990.
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26. Current challenges in pharmacovigilance: Pragmatic approaches. Report of CIOMS Working Group V. Geneva: The Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences; 2001.
27. Guidelines for good clinical practice (GCP) for trials on pharmaceutical products. The use of essential drugs. Sixth report of the WHO Expert Committee. Geneva: World Health Organization; 1995, Annex 3 (WHO Technical Report Series,No. 850).
28. Stephens MD. Detection of New Adverse Drug Reactions. Scotland: MacMillan Publishers; 1998. ISBN 0-333-693914.
29. WHO Drug Dictionary. Uppsala, Uppsala Monitoring Centre electronic database, updated quarterly. Available from: umc-products.com/[last accessed on 2010 ApI' 30].
30. Rawlins MD. Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions. Br J Clin Pharmacol 1988;26:1-11.
31. Academic J.Plant Sci.l. (2):26-36,2008.

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