You are hereFORMULATION AND EVALUTION OF MUCOADHESIVE THERMOSENSITIVE PLURONIC LECITHIN ORGANOGEL OF CLOTRIMAZOLE FOR VAGINAL CANDIDASIS

FORMULATION AND EVALUTION OF MUCOADHESIVE THERMOSENSITIVE PLURONIC LECITHIN ORGANOGEL OF CLOTRIMAZOLE FOR VAGINAL CANDIDASIS


TABLE 3: Percentage Drug Release from Organogel Formulations (F1-F6)

Time (hr.)

F1

F2

F3

F4

F5

F6

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

10±0.66

9±0.54

11±0.54

9.8±0.57

10.4±0.41

10.3±0.37

2

14±0.76

13±0.35

17±0.12

11.1±0.45

16.3±0.53

17.3±0.45

3

16±0.44

15±0.54

20±0.32

12.8±0.58

19.6±0.37

20±0.38

4

21±0.62

19±0.84

22±0.43

16.2±0.69

21.4±0.48

20.7±0.38

5

26±0.41

24±0.94

25±0.52

18.2±0.54

24±0.42

22.7±0.35

6

28.4±0.64

27±0.15

26±0.74

21.3±0.48

25.2±0.39

25.3±0.33

7

34.5±0.58

33±0.19

29±0.79

21.9±0.55

28.3±0.41

31.4±0.37

8

38±0.64

37±0.51

31±0.54

23.3±0.72

30.1±0.50

32.5±0.39

9

40±0.76

39±0.23

32±0.83

24.12±0.70

31.5±0.34

38.4±0.43

10

43±0.85

41±0.11

35±0.19

25.13±0.89

33.3±0.43

40.4±0.39

24

74±0.69

71±0.78

69±0.45

50.06±0.35

67.9±0.43

61.14±0.46

TABLE 4: Percentage Drug Release from Organogel Formulations (F6-F12)

Time (hr.)

F7

F8

F9

F10

F11

F12

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

9.83±0.29

8.76±0.37

9.5±0.34

10.3±0.31

25.6±0.42

15.5±0.73

2

10.71±0.45

10.88±0.38

16±0.51

17.3±0.39

31.4±0.49

19±0.38

3

13.1±0.31

12.21±0.38

17±0.59

20±0.18

36.4±0.51

24.8±0.34

4

14.1±0.40

15.09±0.34

23±0.73

25.4±0.89

37.1±0.59

29.7±0.25

5

15.4±0.46

20±0.35

26±0.83

28.4±0.82

38.2±0.29

32.2±0.12

6

16.4±0.42

22.74±0.45

29±0.61

31±0.64

40.7±0.74

34.3±0.67

7

17.72±0.29

25.9±0.44

32±0.90

35±0.53

41.7±0.78

37.9±0.64

8

19.03±0.38

31.5±0.49

35±0.41

38±0.42

43.5±0.81

40.3±0.59

9

21.52±0.47

34.22±0.34

43±0.71

44±0.17

51.68±0.89

46.6±0.49

10

23.65±0.39

36.48±0.35

45±0.42

47±0.83

54.51±0.39

49.6±0.43

24

41.06±0.36

60.7±0.41

77±0.49

81±0.19

93.8±0.29

86±0.11

MIC ranges (mg/mL) was 0.5−16. No intrazonal growth was observed in the antifungal  method. Inhibition zone diameters ranged from 5 to 35mm . Interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and 95% confidence intervals for comparing the methods were calculated using log2 transformed data.


Fig 7: Antifungal efficacy study against Candida albicansby agar diffusion method employing cup plate technique A: Front view B: Zoom section

CONCLUSION
The data in this study support the potential effectiveness of a vaginal gel with mucoadhesive properties to ensure longer residence time in the application site because of prolonged release properties Controlled release of the incorporated drug is achieved, suggesting better patient compliance and higher therapeutic efficacy.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors are thankful to Smriti College of pharmaceutical Education, Indore for providing facilities to carry out this work.

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